4 ways to save a web page on an iPhone or Android phone


Updated August 3, 2017 to reflect Android N (7.1.2) and iOS X 10 (10.3.3).
 

So, you’re surfing the web on your Android or iOS device when you come across a page you want to save—not just bookmark, but keep, either locally on your handset or to your favorite cloud drive.

Not a problem. There are, in fact, a few different ways to save a webpage as a PDF, which you can then save to your device’s on-board storage or sync to a cloud service like Dropbox or Google Drive. You can also save lengthy articles to an offline reader app, or send the entire text of a page in the body of an email message.

Read on for four ways to save a webpage for later using Android or iOS, starting with…

Add a webpage to your Reading List (iOS only)

Bookmarking a webpage in Safari for iPhone or iPad does little more than save the page’s URL in a thicket of nested bookmark folders—and if you happen to lose your network connection, pulling up a bookmark will give you nothing but an error message.

Add a webpage to your Reading List Ben Patterson

iOS’s Reading List feature can take a functional snapshot of any webpage, then save it to your handset’s local storage for offline reading.

The beauty of iOS’s Reading List feature is that it can take a functional snapshot of any webpage, save it to your handset’s local storage for offline reading, and sync it with all your other iCloud-connected devices.

To save a webpage to your Reading List, just open the page in Safari, tap the Action button (the square button with the arrow) at the bottom of the screen, then tap Add to Reading List.

To open your Reading List, tap the Bookmarks button (the button that looks like an open book), then tap the Reading List tab (it’s the icon that looks like a pair of reading glasses).

Note: Adding a webpage to your Reading List won’t necessarily save it for all time. In my tests, I found that Reading List will try to grab the latest version of a page if your device is online, and if the page happens to disappear from the web, you’ll get a “page not found” error (or something along those lines). If you go back offline, Reading List usually goes back to the older, “cached” version.




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